Daniel Radcliffe Will Make You Ask, “Harry Who?”

Horns, poster, movie, Daniel Radcliffe

Poster for Horns with Daniel Radcliffe

One viewing of the first trailer for Horns, and it is clear ole’ DanRad, who is still only twenty five years old, by the way, has a very bright post-Potter future ahead of him.

Personally, I’m not a fan of the world of Harry Potter, nor any of its other inhabitants, since I’m one of the few people on the planet who has neither read the books nor seen the films. (Yeah, yeah…they’re on my list.) That said, I do not reside under a rock. I’m well aware of Daniel Radcliffe’s rabid fanbase and how desperately they want him to succeed.

To that end, Horns, which is based on the novel of the same name by Joe Hill (son of Stephen King), is a hotly anticipated commodity, especially since it premiered at TIFF last year. Now, thanks to the film’s promotional appearance at Comic Con,  there is finally a full length trailer. I may be wrong, but this might be the flick that finally allows Radcliffe to step out of Harry’s shadow for good. He’s been steadily taking on roles with more and more edge and banking his indie cred the past few years. He’s even proven he can topline a film that doesn’t have the Potter name attached, when he starred in British chiller The Woman in Black (which earned enough to demand a sequel).

In Horns, Radcliffe plays a man trying to unravel the mystery behind what happened to his girlfriend, as well has why the hell he’s suddenly beginning to sprout…well, horns.

The story follows a 26-year-old man (Daniel Radcliffe) who wakes up after a nasty hangover to find his girlfriend (Juno Temple) has been raped and murdered and he’s the lead suspect. Then he discovers horns growing out of his head that grant him the power to make people confess their sins, which comes in handy as he searches for his girlfriend’s killer and prepares for revenge.

Take a look at the full-length trailer at MTV (there’s also a teaser below):
http://www.mtv.com/videos/movie-trailers/1065309/horns.jhtml
Is it me or does this seem to have a wickedly twisted sense of humor ? And while I can (grudgingly) see Shia LaBeouf in the role (he had it first then dropped out – who knows why), I think Radcliffe’s gonna kill this (with a pretty good American accent, too). I’m in! I may skip the multiplex (because let’s be honest, the honest will be comprised of Harry-heads and Potter-ettes, at least on the first weekend), but I’ll catch it on OnDemand (Radius-TWC is distributing, guaranteeing a multi-platform release).

Directed by Alexandre Aja (The Hills Have Eyes, Piranha 3D– that must be where the sense of humor comes from) with a script by Keith Bunin (“In Treatment”), Horns also stars Max Minghella, Heather Graham, James Remar, Joe Anderson, Kelli Garner, and Kathleen Quinlan, and will be released, appropriately enough, on October 31 in the US and the UK.

Teaser:

Preview Viggo Mortensen, Kirsten Dunst and Oscar Isaac in The Two Faces of January

two-faces-of-january-poster

The stylish novels of Patricia Highsmith lend themselves particularly well to cinematic adaptation, becoming equally stylish thrillers like Hitchcock’s Strangers On A Train and Rene Clement’s Purple Noon as well as Anthony Minghella’s The Talented Mr. Ripley, both based on the novel of that name. Now comes Hossein Amini’s The Two Faces of January.
Amini, the talented writer of Drive and Snow White and The Huntsman, among many others, makes his directorial debut with this film, a passion project he’s been trying to get made for more than fifteen years. He and producer Tom Sternberg finally secured the participation of Studio Canal and Working Title, with the help of the box office appeal of their leading players, Viggo Mortensen, Kirsten Dunst and the suddenly white-hot Oscar Isaac, and the cameras rolled in August 2012.

1962. A glamorous American couple, the charismatic Chester MacFarland (Mortensen) and his alluring younger wife Colette (Dunst), arrive in Athens by boat via the Corinth Canal. While sightseeing at the Acropolis they encounter Rydal (Isaac), a young, Greek-speaking American who is working as a tour guide, scamming tourists on the side. Drawn to Colette’s beauty and impressed by Chester’s wealth and sophistication, Rydal gladly accepts their invitation to dinner. However, all is not as it seems with the MacFarlands and Chester’s affable exterior hides darker secrets. When Rydal visits the couple at their exclusive hotel, Chester presses him to help move the body of a seemingly unconscious man who he claims attacked him. In the moment, Rydal agrees but as events take a more sinister turn he finds himself compromised and unable to pull himself free. His increasing infatuation with the vulnerable and responsive Colette gives rise to Chester’s jealousy and paranoia, leading to a tense and dangerous battle of wits between the two men.

Glamor, style, intrigue, sun-soaked locations, beautiful people… As Viggo Mortensen says in one of the featurettes below, The Two Faces of January looks the way movies used to look. I’m in.
If the ingénue looks familiar, it’s because she looks exactly like her mother, Joely Richardson. Daisy Bevan, whose father is producer Tim Bevan of Working Title, third generation acting royalty (Grandma is Vanessa Redgrave), doesn’t quite make her debut with this film, since she had bit parts as a child in both Elizabeth and The Affair of the Necklace, but it is her first  film role as an adult.
The Two Faces of January also features a cast of international actors as well as the gorgeous locations in Greece and Turkey where it was shot.
Starting with its gala premiere at the 2014 Berlinale in February, the film has played festivals all over the world and opened in the UK on May 16. If it makes sense that The November Man opens in August, I guess it makes sense that The Two Faces of January will open in theaters in the US on October 3. (Also On Demand August 28)

If you’re still on the fence, take a look at these clips and featurettes. They verge on spoilers, but they also reinforce the idea that Amini has given us a neo-noir worthy of our time and attention.
Featurette #1

Featurette #2

Featurette #3

Clip #1

Clip #2

Clip #3